Removable Partial Dentures

partial dentures

How do you wear a removable partial denture?

Removable partial dentures usually consist of replacement teeth attached to pink or gum-colored plastic bases, which are connected by metal framework. Removable partial dentures attach to your natural teeth with metal clasps or devices called precision attachments. Precision attachments are generally more esthetic than metal clasps and they are nearly invisible. Crowns on your natural teeth may improve the fit of a removable partial denture and they are usually required with attachments. Dentures with precision attachments generally cost more than those with metal clasps.

How long should I wear the denture?

You will be given specific instructions about how long the denture should be worn and when it should be removed. Initially, you may be asked to wear your partial denture all the time. Although this may be temporarily uncomfortable, it is the quickest way to identify those denture parts that may need adjustment. If the denture puts too much pressure on a particular area, that spot will become sore. Dr. Cox will adjust the denture to fit more comfortably. After making adjustments, it will probably be recommended that you take the denture out of your mouth before going to bed and replace it in the morning.

Will it be difficult to eat with a partial denture?

Replacing missing teeth should make eating a more pleasant experience. Start out by eating soft foods that are cut into small pieces. Chew on both sides of the mouth to keep even pressure on the denture. Avoid foods that are extremely sticky or hard. You may want to avoid chewing gum while you adjust to the denture.

Will the denture change how I speak?

It can be difficult to speak clearly when you are missing teeth. Consequently, wearing a partial denture may help. If you find it difficult to pronounce certain words with your new denture, practice reading out loud. Repeat the words that give you trouble. With time, you will become accustomed to speaking properly with your denture.

How do I take care of my denture?

Handling a denture requires care. It's a good idea to stand over a folded towel or a sink of water just in case you accidentally drop the denture. Brush the denture each day to remove food deposits and plaque. Brushing your denture helps prevent the appliance from becoming permanently stained. It's best to use a brush that is designed for cleaning dentures. A denture brush has bristles that are arranged to fit the shape of the denture. A regular, soft-bristled toothbrush is also acceptable. Avoid using a brush with hard bristles, which can damage the denture.

Some people use hand soap or mild dishwashing liquid to clean their dentures, which are both acceptable. Other types of household cleaners and many toothpastes are too abrasive and should not be used for cleaning dentures.

Clean your dentures by thoroughly rinsing off loose food particles. Moisten the brush and apply the denture cleaner. Brush all denture surfaces gently to avoid damaging the plastic or bending the attachments.

A denture could lose its proper shape if it is not kept moist. At night, the denture should be placed in soaking solution or water. However, if the appliance has metal attachments, they could be tarnished if placed in soaking solution.

Will my denture need adjusting?

Over time, adjusting the denture may be necessary. As you age, your mouth naturally changes, which can affect the fit of the denture. Your bone and gum ridges can recede or shrink, resulting in a loose-fitting denture. Dentures that do not fit properly should be adjusted by your dentist. Loose dentures can cause various problems, including sores or infections. See your dentist promptly if your denture becomes loose.


complete dentures

What is a Complete Denture?

A Complete Denture is an appliance that is inserted in the mouth, replaces all of the natural teeth in an arch and provides support for the cheeks and lips.

Most dentures are made of acrylic and can be fabricated two different ways.

  • A conventional denture is made after all teeth have been extracted and the tissues (gums) have healed.
  • An immediate denture is fabricated and inserted immediately after the teeth are extracted and the tissues are allowed to heal under the denture.
  • An upper denture has acrylic, usually flesh colored, that covers the palate (roof of the mouth).
  • A lower denture is shaped like a horseshoe to leave room for the tongue.

The teeth are made of plastic or porcelain. Dentures can be fabricated to fit right over the patientís gums or over root canal treated teeth. A complete denture can also be attached to dental implants to allow for a more secure fit of the appliance.

Dentures over a normal course of time will wear and need to be replaced or relined in order to keep the jaw alignment normal. The alignment will slowly change as the bone and gum ridges recede or shrink due to the extraction of the teeth. Regular dental examinations are still important for the denture wearer so that the oral tissues can be checked for disease or change.

How are complete dentures made?

Denture fabrication usually takes approximately five appointments. Over the first couple appointments, impressions are made of the patientís bony ridges and gums. Subsequently, preliminary appliances are made and used to record bite and facial relations of the patient to allow fabrication of the denture.

Material and color are chosen to allow selection of the denture teeth that will be used. The preliminary denture appliances are then replaced with heat-cured acrylic and the final denture is completed.

Making adjustments to both the denture base and the teeth fits the denture or dentures to the patientís mouth. After the patients works with the dentures for a few days, it will probably be necessary to return to the office for further adjustments.

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